One Sentence

Have a look at breadtagsagas.com! Same blog more polished layout.

Home   about   contact   travel   food   books   art   the rest   galleries   navigation

Keira Knightley, Anna Karenina UK Film 2012
Featured Image: Keira Knightley, Anna Karenina, UK Film 2012

ORT_Logo   Breadtag Sagas ©: Author Tony, 1 June 2018

One Sentence: a story about great sentences and great first sentences

This article on one sentence may veer in an entirely different direction, or not! I don’t always want to be predictable.

Journalists and newspapers often write articles on the first lines or one sentence of novels in holiday periods and the best of them are marvellous. Jane Austen and Tolstoy are always the first cabs off the rank.


Great opening sentences in fiction

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, 1813

Comment: This one sentence isn’t a bad summary of the novel. Underlying it is an indictment of late 18th Century inheritance laws and the inability of women to make their own way in the world, of which Jane Austen was painfully aware. She covers this topic in all her books on 18th century county life and manners.

The Story: David Bader’s Haiku barely does a better job than Jane’s sentence.

Single white lass seeks,

landed gent for marriage, whist, 

No parsons, thank you.


All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy, 1878

Comment: Leo Tolstoy’s one sentence doesn’t summarise the novel but it is a wonderful beginning and sets the atmosphere that permeates the book.

The first sentence, however, doesn’t make the novel and a brilliant first sentence is not necessary to a good novel. Nevertheless, from the two examples, one does want to read on: Find out what happens next!

To Continue, CLICK HERE.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s