Linocut 101 for Artists

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Untitled 1, Linocut 30x30 cm

ORT_Logo   Breadtag Sagas ©: Author Tony, 2 January 2018

Linocut 101 for Artists — A Practical Introductory Guide

Preamble

My art practice was languishing, partly I think because the three quasi-religious works in the Moral Ambiguities exhibition in 2011 (which I had been working on for some time) and even the generic protest posters were an end point of my photomedia work and I didn’t really have anything more to say. It had been a wild ride for ten years and I’d always thought of myself as an accidental artist. Hence, I wasn’t particularly upset at the time.

Denise and I then embarked on an amateur learning endeavour, trying out drawing, life drawing, basic painting techniques and other things, which were both enjoyable and satisfying.

We went to an open day at Gorman House in Canberra in early 2018 mainly to support jewellery maker Phoebe Porter who is the daughter of close friends. In one of the open studios a woman was making rubber stamps as an art medium and we duly stamped some cave painting style horses onto a piece of paper. I liked the pattern I did and the way one could do lighter and darker impressions depending on how hard one pressed on the ink pad. I liked the result enough that I put it on the fridge.

Now despite my involvement in artist exchange portfolios with printmakers, I’d never been especially attracted to printmaking nor thought I ever would. However, the rubber stamps inspired me, but I thought to myself linocutting is the place to start.

I was attracted to lino, I don’t know why!

This article, however, isn’t about me in particular. It is about how I went about learning without initially any tuition or support. I want to share my experiences because I think are a good starting point for anyone, particularly if you don’t want to begin with a course.

To Continue, CLICK HERE.

Posted in Te Horo, New Zealand

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