Classic SciFi 9: Isaac Asimov I, Robot & Killer Robots

Have a look at breadtagsagas.com! Same blog more polished layout.

Home   about   contact   travel   food   books   art   the rest   galleries   navigation

iRobot Feature

ORT_Logo   Breadtag Sagas ©: Author Tony,  1 April 2017


Isaac Asimov I, Robot & Killer Robots Today

Introduction

The killer robots come later. I bought two novels at Asia Books in Bangkok in late February and was offered, as part of a promotion, one book free from a remainder pile. I dithered between a beginners guide to Nietzche (not a Belgian — Google it!) and The Robots of Dawn.

The Robots of Dawn is a ‘whodunit’ science fiction novel by Isaac Asimov, first published in 1983. It is the third novel in Asimov’s Robot series (Wikipedia). The first novel is I, Robot (1950).

I, Robot is not really a novel but a collection of previously published stories with linking text, by a fictional researcher cum writer.

The Robots of Dawn I found to be incredibly tedious and lacking in action. I must grudgingly admit though that it contained some interesting ideas about robots and humans. I would only recommend these novels and the additional robot stories beyond those in I, Robot to an Asimov scholar. I, Robot is quite sufficient to gain an understanding of Asimov’s approach to and ideas on robots. Continue reading “Classic SciFi 9: Isaac Asimov I, Robot & Killer Robots”

Advertisements

Classic SciFi 5: William Gibson’s Art of Prophecy


Have a look at breadtagsagas.com! Same blog more polished layout.

Home   about   contact   travel   food   books   art   the rest   galleries   navigation

William Gibson Neuromancer Featured Image

ORT_Logo   Breadtag Sagas ©: Author Tony,  10 June 2016


Classic SciFi 5: William Gibson’s Art of Prophecy

Introduction

The articles Classic Scifi 4: William Gibson Neuromancer 1984 and The Art of Prophesy & William Gibson provide a necessary background. The articles to follow on Count Zero 1986 and Mona Lisa Overdrive 1988 will complete the series.

I introduced the Guardian article by Ed Cumming published in 2014 on Neuromancer’s 30th birthday and discussed it a little in the Further information section of Classic Scifi 4: William Gibson Neuromancer.

Cumming’s begins with the truism:

Prescience can be tedious for science-fiction writers. Being proven right about a piece of technology or a trend distracts from the main aim of the work: to show us how we live now.  William Gibson knows this as well as anyone. Since the late 70s, the American-born novelist has been pulling at the loose threads of our culture to imagine what will come out. He has been right about a great deal, but mainly about the shape of the internet and how it filters down to the lowest strata of society.

Continue reading “Classic SciFi 5: William Gibson’s Art of Prophecy”